A floating landmark for Copenhagen Harbour by Junya Ishigami + Associates and Svendborg Architects

© Svendborg Architects

© Svendborg Architects
© Svendborg Architects

Launched by the non-profit organization HOPE- Foundation Junya Ishigami ans Svendborg Architects have won the competiotn to to provide a physical manifestation of the work done by the UN and other international  peace organizations. Their plan for a monumental cloud-like building with a boating lake island will become the "symbol of peace" for Copenhagens´s harbour.  
According to the motto "cloud as roof and ocean as floor" the House of Peace, "HOPE" that was designed as a collaboration between Japanese firm Junya Ishigami + Associates and Danish studio Svendborg Architects, "provides a journey of the senses (...) that takes you back to the purity of being - ready to embrace the world." According to the Architects statement, "visitors will be able to see the House of Peace appearing as a cloud floating in between the sea and the skyline. With its unique appearance from every angle the House of Peace will be present in its own right as an element in the water and at the same time appear as an integrated landmark with a strong iconographic quality as a landmark at Nordhavn. An elegant sculpture which ads artistic value to the whole city of Copenhagen. The building's organic shape and strong simplicity stands out in the harbors otherwise orthogonal and rigid character. The House of Peace captivates the sight by floating on the water as a cloud in the sky as a monument of peace. The cloud shaped sculpture becomes both roof and wall. The water surface will serve as the floor.  The space is thus always filled with new influences and will never twice be experienced as the same.  At the platform in the main room the visitors can board circular boats and enter the silence of the water surface. The boats can drift out into the entire room. The boats are floating seemingly effortless like leaves or water lilies on water. According to the chairman of the HOPE Foundation, Morten Langebæk "the winning proposal meets every bit of the vision of our project. T his is nothing less than an architectural masterpiece. A fascinating, poetic building and an obvious symbol of peace; at the same time a building, a sculpture and a symbol." As mentioned by Langebæk, the space will be one that people will want to visit again and again. "The work is from the outside an expression of a snow-white cloud that seems to float on the water. In its own way it brings nature and the countryside into the city and stands as a positive and welcoming landmark that is obviously related to the concept of peace. The inside of the building is carefully designed to exploit the water and its movements, reflections and colour, light and shadow. The result is deeply fascinating and at the same time peaceful." 
The House of Peace will be constructed in the centre of the Nordhavnen, alongside the recently completed United Nations regional headquarters designed by 3XN, and will be one of the first structures visible to those travelling to Copenhagen by sea.

Otto Piene - More Sky at Berlin`s Neue Nationalgalerie & Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle

Otto Piene The Proliferation of the Sun, 2014 Installation view Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin-Photo:David von Becker
Otto Piene The Proliferation of the Sun, 2014 Installation view Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin-Photo:David von Becker
Otto Piene More Sky Installation view Deutsche Bank KunstHalle Berlin Photo: Mathias Schormann

Otto Piene More Sky Installation view Deutsche Bank KunstHalle Berlin Photo: Mathias Schormann
Otto Piene "Berlin Superstar", 1984 for the opening of the exhibition "Die Zukunft der Metropolen: Paris - London - Berlin", Ernst-Reuter-Platz, Berlin, 1984 Photo: Otto Piene Archive / ZERO foundation

Otto Piene Opening Program "The Proliferation of the Sun ", 1966–67, 25-minute performance with hand-painted glass slides, sound, and five Carousel projectors, Galerie Art Intermedia, Cologne, Germany,  1967 © Walter Vogel

Sadly, last week one of the key artist of the twentieth century avant-garde and one of the founders of the international ZERO movement in the 1960s, Otto Piene past away at age 86, just one day after the opening of his solo exhibition at Berlin`s Neue Nationalgalerie and Deutsche Bank KunstHalle. Even greater becomes the significance and impact of this, the artist`s very last, large scale joint exhibtion: Otto Piene.More Sky. Despite the sudden and unexpected death of the artist, the planned, spectacular sky art event took place outside the Neue Nationalgalerie on Saturday to mark the start of the exhibition. Three illuminated, up to 90 meters high air sculptures in a star shape, including the Berlin Superstar, which Piene showed for the first time in 1984 at Berlin`s Technische Universität, played the night sky of the German capital.
Exploring the enormous breath and experimental attitude of Piene`s early work, the exhibition at Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle presents early stencil paintings, light prints and light sculptures, impressive smoke drawings and fire paintings to show the artist?s experimental approach with the elements air, fire, and light. 
Each evening from 10pm to 3am, the slide installation "The Proliferation of the Sun" will be shown at Neue Nationalgalerie. Originally conceived for a small off space in New York in 1967 and performed that same year in Nuremberg, Cologne, and Dortmund, colorfully shimmering shapes on over 1000 hand-painted glass slides are projected into the open exhibition space, resulting in what Piene calls a “poetic journey through space.” The reconstruction of this spectral color experience will develop a special evocative power in the upper hall of the Neue Nationalgalerie, confronting the architecture of the Mies van der Rohe building with Piene’s idealism and utopian visions.
Born in Laasphe, Germany in 1928, Otto Piene played a definitive role in art’s programmatic new beginning by including elementary natural forces. His smoke and fire images, his light spaces and light ballets stand for a virtually romantic longing for unity with nature.
Otto Piene’s interdisciplinary large projects in public space were pioneering, beginning in the late 1960s in the context of MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies, where he served as director beginning in 1974, or his monumental rainbow for the closing ceremony of the 20th Olympic Games in Munich in 1972. Piene’s intense collaboration with natural scientists and technicians opened new perspectives for art that can be found echoed in contemporary positions like those of Olafur Eliasson, Carsten Höller, or Tomás Saraceno.A reprint of the central Piene publication More Sky from 1973 will be published by Verlag der Buchhandlung Walter König (Cologne) to mark the exhibition.
The exhibition will be on until August 31. More info here.

Saturday Soundtrack - The Best in Film Music 1983: The Right Stuff (Bill Conti) Return of the Jedi (John Williams) Under Fire (Jerry Goldsmith)

Max Peter on the best film music of 1983:










When one looks at the history of film music one will notices that there were two composers who dominated the art of writing music for film and television from the early 1960s. Every year since their careers had begun, Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams composed important and revolutionary scores for the big (cinema) and the small screen (television). They established their distinguished musical talents with compositions of extraordinary dramatic power and melodic value. In 1983 Goldsmith as well as Williams wrote powerful music for the big screen, too. Williams, for example, completed the music for the first trilogy of the Star Wars saga. Director Richard Marquand filmed the screenplay by George Lucas and Lawrence Kasdan and brought the series to a dignified close. For Return of the Jedi, Williams returned to the famous Abbey Road Studios in London, where the well-known London Symphony Orchestra performed the trilogy´s longest score in January and February 1983. The phenomenal soundtrack for Return of the Jedi received another Oscar nomination. His score for the first part of Star Wars (1977) had won the beloved trophy. 
In the same year, Jerry Goldsmith received an Academy Award nomination for his masterful work for Under Fire. Roger Spottiswoode´s film is set during the last days of the Nicaraguan revolution in 1979. It stars Nick Nolte, Gene Hackman and Joanna Cassidy. Even Pauline Kael (1919-2001), a popular film critic of the New Yorker magazine and no fan of film music, liked the score and called it some of the greatest film music ever written. Jazz guitarist Pat Metheny performed Goldsmith´s brilliant guitar solos. His skills appear especially in the cue Bajo Fuego, which is an outstanding piece of music for guitar and orchestra and one of the most popular pieces of the whole soundtrack. 
That Goldsmith didn´t win his second Oscar for that particular score is one of the mysteries of Hollywood. 
The other three scores, which were nominated for Oscars, were Cross Creek (Leonard Rosenman), Terms of Endearment (Michael Gore) and The Right Stuff. The latter, composed by American composer and conductor Bill Conti, won the trophy for ´Best Original Score´. Conti was famous for his work and especially his theme for Rocky (1976). His music For The Right Stuff is spectacular and heroic, and sets a powerful musical statement to the American drama film, directed by Philip Kaufman. 
It´s surely appropriate to mention a – at this time – younger composer of the business, who began to establish his name in the community in the early 1980s. After his score for Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, James Horner composed further mentionable scores in 1983. Even though he wrote very effective music for Brainstorm, Gorky Park and Something Wicked This Way Comes, his soundtrack for Krull contains one of his best love themes and shows the composer´s most distinguished work of the year.  
By Maximilian Peter

Announcement of 2014 RIBA stirling prize shortlist

London school of economics - saw swee hock student centre by o’donnell + tuomey architects
London bridge tower (the shard) by renzo piano building workshop
Library of birmingham by mecanoo
Everyman theatre, Liverpool by haworth tompkins
London aquatics centre by zaha hadid architects
Manchester school of art by feilden clegg bradley studios

The 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize Shortlist has been announced last week. For this years awards, six new buildings compete against each other, including previous Stirling Prize winners Zaha Hadid and Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, while Mecanoo and Renzo Piano Building Workshop have been nominated for the first time.The projects will be judged according to their design excellence and their contribution to the evolution of the built environment. A common theme throughout this years designs is a focus on transformative public structures, intrinsically linked to their respective communities, and offering a sense of optimism in the wake of recent financial turbulence. The winner of the 2014 RIBA Stirling Prize will be announced on the evening of thursday 16 october at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in London. The judges, who will visit the six buildings and select the winner are: Spencer de Grey – chair (Foster and Partners), MJ Long (Long and Kentish architects), Cindy Walters (Walters and Cohen),Sephen Kieran (Kieran Timberlake) and Sir Timothy Sainsbury.

The nominated architects are listed below:


Everyman theatre, Liverpool by haworth tompkins

Library of birmingham by mecanoo
London aquatics centre by zaha hadid architects
London bridge tower (the shard) by renzo piano building workshop
London school of economics - saw swee hock student centre by o’donnell + tuomey architects

Manchester school of art by feilden clegg bradley studios

Ed Atkins - Ribbons (2014) at Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London

Stills from the three-channel HD video Ribbons (2014)© 2014 Ed Atkins Courtesy of CABINET, London and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin

Ed Atkins-Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June – 25 August 2014) Photograph © 2014 READS

Ed Atkins Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June – 25 August 2014) Photograph © 2014 READS
Ed Atkins Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June – 25 August 2014) Photograph © 2014 READS
Ed Atkins Installation view, Serpentine Sackler Gallery, London (11 June – 25 August 2014) Photograph © 2014 READS
Last week the Ed Atkins exhibition opened at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, premiering his work "Ribbons" (2014). The exhibition centers around an augmented and appended version of the new multi-screen video work Ribbons, transforming the Serpentine Sackler Gallery into a submersive environment of syncopated sounds, bodies and spaces. Presented alongside installations of text and images, accompanying videos and tourettic interjections, the exhibition underscores the ambivalent relationship that exists between real and virtual objects; between real and virtual conditions. Sounds from a suite of synchronised projections positioned throughout the Gallery lead the visitor through the space, with glimpses of song, swells of orchestra, murmuring voices and waves of sub-bass. Ribbons is part musical, part horror, and part melodrama; Bach’s "Erbarme Dich" and Randy Newman’s "I think it’s going to rain today" are two of the songs featured. Naked, lonely and misanthropic, the palpable melancholy of Atkins’s Computer Generated avatar hero is ‘rendered’ as HD graphic, troll, voyeur and, perhaps, artist. Atkins’s work draws attention to the way in which we perceive, communicate and filter information. His videos combine layered images with incomplete or interrupted excerpts of singing, speech, subtitles and handwriting. Working with a specialist in computer generated animation, Atkins exploits the hyperreal surfaces produced by new software systems to create complex, nightmarish environments populated by virtual characters, avatars of ambiguous provenance and desires. Atkins has described the male figure that appears in these works as ‘a character that is literally a model, is demonstrably empty – a surrogate and a vessel’. Despite the emotive music and poetic syntax of the protagonists, their emptiness serves to remind the three-dimensional, warm-bodied viewer of their own physicality.
“The Sackler exhibition will re-possess some sort of sub-horror genre; the old powder rooms, haunted by the phantom smell of gunpowder, paranoia and anticipation of violence, will emphasise a particularly phantasmatic aspect of Ribbons; the protagonist’s questionable corporeality, their presence, their performance of loss and monstrousness” – Ed Atkins, as stated on the galleries website.
It is largest solo exhibition of Ed Atkins in a UK public institution to date and will  be on view until 25 August 2014.

Saturday Soundtrack: The Best in Film Music 1982: Poltergeist (Jerry Goldsmith), E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (John Williams), First Blood (Jerry Goldsmith)






Max Peter on the best film music of 1982:


The American news magazines Time and Newsweek called the cinematic summer of 1982 „the Steven Spielberg summer“. Both E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and Poltergeist were released in that summer, a week apart in June. Although Spielberg wasn´t credited as director of Poltergeist, he was the secret boss of the supernatural horror film. He directed some key sequences instead of Tobe Hooper and handled the whole post-production. Because of that, Spielberg worked together with composer Jerry Goldsmith for the first time since his preferred composer John Williams was busy working on Spielberg´s science fiction hit E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial at the same time.
Poltergeist had a budget of $10.7 million and brought in more than $120 million. Today, the horror jewel is regarded as one of the most satisfying and popular movies of the genre. Additional, it is one of the most scariest films ever made and was nominated for three Academy Awards, including ´Best Sound Editing´ and ´Best Visual Effects´. Jerry Goldsmith´s music was nominated for an Oscar, too. Having won the beloved trophy for his masterful horror score for The Omen (released in 1976), the composer was the perfect choice to write music for Poltergeist. The musician was going through an extraordinarily strong compositional phase at the time, composing scores of incomparable orchestral force and emotion. The plot of the movie focuses on the Freelings, a family, which lives in a California suburb. One day, malevolent ghosts abduct Carol Anne, the family´s youngest daughter, and a group of parapsychologists come to the Freeling´s house to investigate and find out how they can get her back. For Carol Anne, but also for the love between the members of the family, Goldsmith wrote a lullaby, which is one of his most beautiful creations for cinema. Goldsmith often told that the movie wasn´t a horror story in the first place, but a story of family´s love for him. The main theme, called Carol Anne´s Theme is impressively presented for the first time in the cue The Neighboorhood. For a horror movie like this, one would never expect such a peaceful and sweet composition. The other material of the score cements the composer´s mastery in writing music for the genre. The musical thoughts for suspenseful scenes are brilliantly constructed in a compositional style only Goldsmith could offer. Within the score, the musician often pitches Carol Anne´s Theme against the more dissonant and disturbing musical ideas, combining musically emotional and dark textures to underline the film´s visuals in a very dramatic way. Goldsmith´s score for this horror treasure is a milestone in film music and was nominated for an Academy Award. Even though Goldsmith didn´t win, because the Oscar went to John Williams and his score for E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, his composition for the Hooper/Spielberg gem is a classic! 

For the science fiction movie about a lonely boy (Elliott) who finds an extraterrestrial who stranded on Earth and becomes friends with E.T., Williams created a romantic and emotional soundtrack of highly melodic value. The film was a worldwide hit, earning over $790 million. It established the young Henry Thomas and the even younger Drew Barrymore as lead stars. Critics acclaimed E.T. as a classic. Robert Ebert wrote perfectly in one of his reviews: „It is one of those movies that brush away our cautions and win our hearts.“ The film´s climax shows one of the golden moments of American cinema: a bittersweet feast of humanity and love. Williams score is the emotional, adventurous and dramatic component of the film, and strengthens the dramatic value of the affecting visuals.
„The Spielberg summer“, 1982, was a very successful one. It brought us two great movies and, of course, two extraordinary scores of ultimate perfection.

But that wasn´t all: when one analyzes the year 1982, one finds more great works of the same composers, which must be mentioned. Williams composed another rich and varied score for Frank Perry´s Monsignor. Even though the film wasn´t a box office success, the score is an important element of the plot and the basis for the film´s visuals. 
Though Poltergeist earned Goldsmith his Best Score nomination for ´82, a lot of critics considered his music for The Secret of NIMH as his finest of the year. With his work on Don Bluth´s animated fantasy adventure film, Goldsmith went different ways in composing music for the genre. He handled NIMH as a live-action movie and not as an animated feature. Revolutionary! 
Another revolutionary score by the same man was the soundtrack for First Blood. John Rambo fans know why! Goldsmith created an action score full of symphonic force and emotion: the main theme mirrors the inner feelings of loneliness of the protagonist. The musical action parts stand against it and influenced the action music of the following decade enormously.

Apart from scores by these two legends, we must not forget to mention some outstanding scores by other composers. George Fenton collaborated with Ravi Shankar on the music for Sir Richard Attenborough´s Gandhi. The film was nominated for Academy Awards in eleven categories, including ´Best Score´ and won in the categories ´Best Picture´, `Best Director´ and ´Best Actor (Ben Kingsley). For Sophie´s Choice, Marvin Hamlisch wrote an emotional score, which earned him a nomination for an Oscar. John Barry composed the music for Frances and Basil Poledouris created the amazing sounds for the popular Conan the Barbarian – a musical milestone for its composer and a treasure of the year! Klaus Doldinger worked on the music Das Boot. His score provide some energy and melody to Wolfgang Petersen´s submarine thriller. 
In the end, the year 1982 is now remembered as one of the big years of film music. A year, full of film music highlights!
By Maximilian Peter



Follow Us